Wednesday, January 29, 2020

The Nursing Shortage and the Nursing Work Environment Essay Example for Free

The Nursing Shortage and the Nursing Work Environment Essay 1. Introduction 1.1 Nursing as challenging profession: significant physical and psychological demands on nurses of all levels 1.2 Qualified nurses as the core key to success in the delivery of healthcare services 1.3 Qualified nursing staff, hospitals, clinics, nursing homes, and other essential healthcare services as contribution to modern world Problem Statement 2.1 The current situation with shortage of qualified nurses in the USA 2.2 The year of 2004: the positive shifts in dealing with nursing shortage 2.3 Population aging and retiring nurses as the main reason of severe nursing shortage Research Question 3.1 The impact of job-related stress on health care organizations and qualified nurses 3.2 Measures to be taken to alleviate job-related stress for nurses 3.3 Reduction of job-related stress as the solution to nursing shortage Research Hypotheses 4.1 Hypothesis 1: Nurses will indicate that they experience job-related stress. 4.2 Hypothesis 2: Job-related stress is a factor in a nurses decision to leave nursing. 4.3 Hypothesis 3: Nurses who have learned to manage their stress will be more likely to continue their careers. Literature Review Job-related stress may have serious implications for patient safety. Increased patient loads, for example, have been associated with elevated stress levels, the increased likelihood of an accident, and a greater risk of the nurse being involved in a medical malpractice lawsuit (Miller, 2004). One study found that 79% of RNs believed that the shortage of qualified nurses has already affected the quality of patient care (Buerhaus,   Donelan,   Ulrich,   Linda Norman,   et al, 2005). Although some studies have found that stress levels may be affected by the mode of nursing, other research has indicated similar levels of stress in functional nursing, team nursing, and primary nursing settings (Mà ¤kinen, Kivimà ¤ki, Elovainio, Virtanen, Bond, 2003). Sources of Stress Stress in nursing comes from physical and mental exertion while working with patients and the emotional stress that comes from dealing with injured, sick, and dying people. Job stress may also affected by staff reductions, especially if those reductions result in increased responsibilities for the remaining staff members (Hertting, Nilsson, Theorell, Larsson, 2004, p. 148). The long-term effects of staff reductions include feelings of distrust towards the employer; (2) concurrent demands and challenges; (3) professional ambiguity; (4) unmet desires for collaboration with other professionals; and (5) efforts to gain control (Hertting, Nilsson, Theorell, Larsson, p. 148) For many nurses, some job-related stress may come from internal sources. Antai-Otong (2001) observed that one pervasive cause of stress among nurses is the feeling that nurses must do everything for everyone all of the time and be perfect while doing it. These unrealistic expectations for perfection may lead to chronic anger, hostility, or repressed aggression, especially if the individual lacks sufficient coping skills to address these emotions (Antai-Otong). To cope with this stress, Antai-Otong recommended that nurses receive training in conflict management, anger management, self-renewal techniques, assertive communication, and other forms of creative stress management. Finally, stress also appears to be affected by age and experience. In studies comparing stress and job satisfaction of older nurses with that of younger nurses, older nurses with more years experience showed less stress and reported more positive experiences as a nurse than their younger counterparts (Ernst, Messmer, Franco, Gonzalez, 2004). Younger nurses reported concerns over compensation, workload, and lack of recognition (Ernst, et al). Ernst, et al., (p. 222) speculated that older nurses had less reason to be worried about income than their younger counterparts because the older nurses were paid more. They also speculated that the expectations and goals of the nurses in the study had become more realistic as they matured, resulting in greater job satisfaction (Ernst, et al., p. 225). Providing Ways to Improve Retention Incentives may be used to motivate nurses to improve their performance or to stay with an employer. Incentives do not necessarily have to be monetary. In some cases, non-monetary incentives such as the opportunity to work in a positive work environment may outweigh relatively small financial incentives. Other incentives that may be used to encourage nurses to stay are educational opportunities, flexible scheduling, health and safety considerations, and the nature of the overall organizational culture (Cohen, 2006). Many nurses are concerned with the balance of their professional and personal responsibilities. Quality of work life (QWL) has been defined as the balance between the individuals professional responsibilities and personal life (Ming-Yi Kernohan, 2006). QWL has been linked to job satisfaction and improved retention. Factors that affect the QWL of nurses include socioeconomic factors, demographic characteristics of the individual nurse (e.g., age, marital status, and other personal characteristics), organizational aspects, work aspects, human relation aspects, and the opportunity for self-actualization through nursing (Ming-Yi Kernohan). Of these, the individuals demographic characteristics and the socioeconomic status of the health care facility and the surrounding area are beyond the control of the organization. Other factors, such as providing opportunities for self-actualization, may be affected by organizational policies but are not exclusively within the domain of the organization. The remaining factors – organizational aspects, work aspects, and human relations aspects – are within the control of the organization. Organizations that wish to improve their retention rates for high-performing nurses may wish to examine how these factors can be adjusted to improve the QWL of nurses working within the organization. Lambert, Lambert, and Yamase (2004) noted that stress is often associated with uncertainty and a lack of information. Providing nurses with information, training, and continuing education can help alleviate these feelings and may help to reduce the overall levels of stress. Lambert, at al. also recommends exercise, physical exertion, and expressing feelings to an inanimate object as appropriate stress-reduction techniques. Environmental changes, such as brightening the environment with flowers and other aesthetically appealing items, may also help reduce the stress levels in the workplace (Lamber, et al.). Finally, Lambert, et al. suggested searching for any possible philosophical or spiritual implications that might help the individual to understand and to cope with the stresses that come along with patient care. Conclusion There is a strong reciprocal relationship between job stress and nurse retention. As nurses within a given facility begin to experience increased stress, the likelihood that some will quit or look for a job elsewhere appears to increase. Consequently, the work loads of the remaining nurses increase, which ratchets up the stress levels, resulting in more nurses leaving the organization. This cycle is not limited to organizations, but also appears to occur within the nursing profession. References Antai-Otong, D. (2001). Creative Stress-Management Techniques For Self-Renewal. Dermatology Nursing, 13, 1, 31-37. Retrieved July 27, 2007, from Academic Search Premier Database. Beaudoin, L., Edgar, L. (2003). Hassles: Their Importance to Nurses Quality of Work Life.   Nursing Economic$, 21, 3, 106-114. Retrieved July 26, 2007, from Academic Search Premier Database. Buerhaus, P., Donelan, K., Ulrich, B., Norman, L., Williams, M., Dittus, R. (2005). Hospital RNs and CNOs Perceptions of the Impact of the Nursing Shortage on the Quality of Care. Nursing Economics, 23, 5, 214-221. Retrieved July 27, 2007, from ProQuest Database Cohen, J. (2006). The Aging Nursing Workforce: How to Retain Experienced Nurses. Journal of Healthcare Management, 51, 4, 233-245. Retrieved July 27, 2007, from Academic Search Premier. Ernst, M., Messmer, P., Franco, M., Gonzalez, J. (2004). Nurses Job Satisfaction, Stress, and Recognition in a Pediatric Setting. Pediatric Nursing, 30, 3, 219-227. Retrieved July 27, 2007, from Academic Search Premier Database. Hertting, A., Nilsson, K., Theorell, T., Larsson, U. (2004). Downsizing and Reorganization: Demands, Challenges, and Ambiguity for Registered Nurses. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 45, 2, 145-154. Retrieved July 27, 2007, from Academic Search Premier Database. Lambert, V., Lambert, C., Yamase, H. (2004). Psychological Hardiness, Workplace Stress and Related Stress Reduction Strategies. Nursing Health Sciences, 5, 2, 181-183. Retrieved July 27, 2007, from Academic Search Premier Database. Mà ¤kinen, A., Kivimà ¤ki M., Elovainio, M., Virtanen, M. Bond, S. (2003). Organization of Nursing Care As a Determinant of Job Satisfaction Among Hospital Nurses.   Journal of nursing management, 11, 5, 299-306. Retrieved July 27, 2007, from Academic Search Premier Database. Miller, D. (2004). Where Have All the Nurses Gone? The Impact of the Nursing Shortage on American Healthcare. Association of Operating Room Nurses. AORN Journal, 80, 1, 141. Retrieved July 27, 2007, from ProQuest Database. Ming-Yi H., Kernohan, G. (2006). Dimensions of Hospital Nurses’ Quality of Working Life.   Journal of Advanced Nursing, 54, 1, 120-131. Retrieved July 27, 2007, from Academic Search Premier. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (2002). Projected Supply, Demand, and Shortages of Registered Nurses: 2000-2020. Department of Health and Human Services, Health Resources and Services Administration, Bureau of Health Professions, National Center for Health Workforce Analysis. Retrieved July 27, 2007, from http://www.ahca.org/research/rnsupply_demand.pdf U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (2004). The Registered Nurse Population. Findings from the March 2004 National Sample Survey of Registered Nurses. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Health Resources and Services Administration, Bureau of Health Professions. Retrieved July 27, 2007, from ftp://ftp.hrsa.gov/bhpr/workforce/0306rnss.pdf

Tuesday, January 21, 2020

Attitudes Towards the Navajo Tribes Language and Culture Essay

In this day and age, and with every passing day, there are numerous languages succumbing to extinction, falling into disuse and anonymity; being forever lost to the winds of time. But as they say, "Every cloud has its silver lining," the silver lining in this case is the increase and rise in awareness and efforts being undertaken to preserve, revitalize, and revive these languages that are not yet lost to us. Something that is revitalized is defined as "being given new life or vigor to," and should we abide by this definition, it is pleasing to see that numerous fit in this criterion; the criteria of being revitalized. This is a report on the Navajo language. This report will explore how the Navajo language, once a prosperous language with thousands of speakers fell into decline and the efforts that are currently being undertaken to revitalize the language. The language is spoken by the Navajo tribe a tribe of approximately 300,048 people, 170,000+ of whom speak Navajo, who are loca ted in the Northeastern part of Arizona, the Northwestern part of New Mexico, and the Southeastern part Utah, all of whom are located in the USA. The years covered span from the decline of the language in the 1850's to our current time. The scope of the enquiry will range from the history of the Navajo, to the decline of the language, the efforts undertaken to revitalize the language, and its current usage. The thesis of this report is that an endangered language can be revitalized. The conclusion will therefore be that yes, an endangered language, one such as Navajo can be revitalized. The Navajo tribe is one of the largest Native American tribes in the United States. Originally from Canada, and descending from the Athabaskan tribes, they migrate... ... "NAVAJO." Austin Business Computers, Inc. Home Page. Navajo Tourism Department, 15 May 1999. Web. 12 Oct. 2011. . "The Navajo People." Oracle ThinkQuest. Library Think Quest. Web. 23 Oct. 2011. . "The Return of Navajo Boy." The Return of Navajo Boy. Web. 16 Nov. 2011. . Ruelas, Richard. "Navajo Film Reaches across Cultural Lines." Arizona Local News - Phoenix Arizona News - Phoenix Breaking News - Azcentral.com. The Arizona Republic, 08 Sept. 2007. Web. 27 Oct. 2011. . "UCLA Language Materials Project: Language Profile." UCLA Language Materials Project: Main. UCLA. Web. 23 Oct. 2011. .

Monday, January 13, 2020

Developing Cultural Flexibility

Developing Cultural Flexibility Portfolio| December 14 2011 | Contents Page Section| Page Number| Q1 – What is the significance of national identity as a source of individuals’ culture? | 2| Q2 -In what aspects of work and employee relations should international managers be aware of religious sensitivities? | 3-4| Q3 -What are Hofstede’s culture dimensions? What correlations does Hofstede make among groups of countries and how valid are they for you? | 5| Q4 – Why do firms’ internationalise’? What are the implications of doing so for their role as employers and how will it affect your role in the future as an employee? 6-7| Bibliography| 8| Q1 -What is the significance of national identity as a source of individuals’ culture? I begin with a definition of culture – ‘the ideas, customs and social behaviour of a particular society’ (Oxford Dictionaries, 2011). In terms of the question I am looking at how significantly ideas, customs and social behaviour of a nation’s identity affects that of the individual’s culture. It’s important to talk about stereotypes, they effect how people perceive the individual and their culture, also it can affect the individual as they may alter their culture to allow them to stand out from their national stereotype e. . people may stereotype Italians as loud and arrogant but some Italians may change their culture to quiet and well-mannered to make themselves more appealing for jobs abroad. Hofstede wrote that culture is ‘A collective programming of minds’, and to some extent I agree with him, people are proud of where they come from and like to promote their nation through their actions, this can mould their actions to some extent. An example is whilst I have been at university I have lived with a Chinese student, we have both said that we had expectations of each other before we had even talked. He expected me to be obsessed with football and beer, whilst I thought he would be a great cook and clever. This ability to anticipate an individual’s culture because of the national identity can be a great starting point for friendship, but it can have a negative effect. Observational learning plays a huge part in our development through child hood, we watch and repeat what our parents and family do. If we have a problem we deal with it how we see them deal with it, I think that this is how individuals develop their culture, not so much from their national identity. Edgar Schein’s belief is that culture is – â€Å"shared systems of beliefs and values†, that culture is the answers to problems. These answers can be learned as a nation, as part of a family or as an individual. It is how individuals deal with these problems that makes their culture individual to them. Although Schein’s 3 levels of culture can to some extent be related to national identity for example the ‘Values and Beliefs’ and ‘Artefacts and creations’. Individual’s belief can be down to their nation’s beliefs, although I think that would have been more applicable in the past. With the development of the internet and communication methods I think that individuals now have the media to find out and decide their own culture. People are travelling all over the world, picking up bits of other cultures and adding to their own. It was similar when America was discovered, people from all over the world moved there bringing their own culture, although there is an American identity, there are patches of America that retain the culture that their people bought with them all. To conclude I believe that national identity is fairly significant to individual’s culture, more so if the individual moves abroad than if they stay in their country. Q2 -In what aspects of work and employee relations should international managers be aware of religious sensitivities? Religion is important throughout the world, with countries becoming more multicultural different religions are clashing leading to war and strained international relationships. This can happen on a smaller scale within organisations. It is up to managers and employees to be aware of each other’s beliefs and respect each other enough to allow them to have their own beliefs. This can be a minefield for today’s international managers where equality is key to running an effective, productive place to work. Globalisation, development in technology, cheaper transportation and international bonds (e. g. European Union) has led to an increase in multi-religious staff, which if international managers are aware of and can work with, it has the potential to offer a lot to organisations, employees bringing different ideas and dvice to the table because of their different religions and knowledge. A difficult example of managing religious sensitivities is allowing Sikhs to carry their ceremonial knife known as ‘Kirpan’ with them at work. It poses difficult problems, one being that it’s dangerous and could create a lot of tension within an organisation. It is an article of faith for the Sikh bu t does that mean its ok to carry a weapon at work? I found an article on the BBC which was headed ‘Sikhs should be allowed to carry ceremonial knives in schools †¦ can religion ever justify loopholes in the law†¦Ã¢â‚¬â„¢ Although this is based on schools, it carries the same principle. Should religion be more important than the law of the country? International managers can experience culture shock on 3 different levels: 1. Emotions – e. g. euphoria to depression 2. Thinking – e. g. from stereotyping to culturally effective thinking 3. Social Skills and Identity – e. g. from national to transnational social skills and an international identity (Source Marx 1999) International managers need to master these 3 levels to achieve global management which Bartholomew and Adler (1996) define as ‘The need for a conceptual shift from a hierarchical perspective of cultural influence, compromise and adaption to one of collaborative cross cultural learning’. This is the aim of all global organisations, although it can be a very slow and hard process it is important and the end result would be a driven team of respected employees. International managers need to be aware of religious holidays, example Jewish festivals, Christmas etc. Should they allow every religious holiday or none? Managers need to prepare for religious holidays e. g. ensure that they have enough stock over the Christmas period when sales increase. A manager cannot be seen to favour certain religions as this could lead to discrimination and problems within the workforce. With globalisation comes an expectancy to work together as a team, not be seen as separate religious groups who are distant to each other. It is partly the manager’s job to ensure this happens but it’s also down to the individuals. We live in a global community, it is now time to start developing a multicultural organisational community. This will be a real test for international managers and organisations. Q3 -What are Hofstede’s culture dimensions? What correlations does Hofstede make among groups of countries and how valid are they for you? Geert Hofstede (b. 1928) carried out a cross cultural study of 116,000 employees of IBM in 40 countries. From his results he distinguished national cultures in terms of five orientations which are: (D. A. BUCHANAN, 2010): 1. Social Orientation – Cultures in the East e. g. India, China have a collective interest where the interests of the group are more important than each individuals gains or praise. Whereas the western counties e. g. UK, America have a more individualistic approach where the individual interests are seen as more important, this idea of personal gain above shared gain. 2. Power Orientation – The idea that some national cultures accept that some people are of a higher authority, they accept the hierarchical idea of power on levels, that some people are born into power whereas other cultures believe that you earn power, and that there should be minimum power difference as it exploits others. 3. Uncertainty Orientation – This describes how cultures react and adapt to change and uncertainty. He found that some cultures prefer structure and consistency and find the uncertain threatening whilst others relish change and new opportunities. 4. Goal Orientation – Also known as masculine and feminine culture orientation. This finds out what motivates people to try and achieve their goals. The masculine orientation is more aggressive assertive behaviour, where material possessions, power and money are motivators. The feminine orientation is the more passive side, where the wellbeing and quality of life of other people is a motivator. 5. Time Orientation – This looks at how different cultures work, is it with short term goals in mind or do they plan for the long term. Those that value long term planning, look forward to future market positions, they ensure that they are ready to meet future commitments. Dedication and hard work are essential. Whereas the short term outlook look for short term profits and value past traditions. Hofstede’s has been criticised over his work, he conducted his survey for IBM because they were concerned with declining morale, it wasn’t designed to distinguish ifferent ‘national cultures’. The use of a survey is also criticised, ‘Many researchers allude a survey is not an appropriate instrument for accurately determining and measuring cultural disparity. ’ (M. L. JONES, 2007) Another criticism is that Hofstede’s study makes the assumption that the population is a homogenous whole, whereas there are always ethnic units and subdivisions wi thin society. It seems to ignore the fact that communities can have very different cultures to the one that is seen as the national culture. It would be impossible to accurately represent all different cultures per nation. Hofstede’s is more of an overview of the national culture and should not be used to stereotype the whole population. Q4 – Why do firms’ internationalise’? What are the implications of doing so for their role as employers and how will it affect your role in the future as an employee? More firms are beginning to ‘internationalise’ and try their hand at the global market, with the goal of making a profit and increasing it year after year. This requires businesses to adapt to the changing times. It has and still is becoming much easier to internationalise, with the development of the internet, faster and cheaper transport overseas, vast improvements in infrastructure and if you are part of a trading power e. g. The European Union, the international trading laws are much more flexible than they used to be. More Benefits for firms to internationalise Location – Find a more attractive market overseas where they wish to operate. May find a central location for main distribution centre to save on delivery costs. Low cost and labour charges – Companies want to produce goods quickly and cheaply so that they can get the biggest return on them e. g. Nike has manufactured its products in sweatshops because people are so desperate for work that they can pay them very little. The BBC’s panorama found as recently as in the year 2000, 12 year old girls in Cambodia were working 16 hours a day for little pay because they were so poor. This can lead to implications for firms that do this, bad publicity, drop in sales and a tarnished global image. Less competition – Large organisations are always on the lookout for gaps in the market that they can exploit, this includes overseas markets. If they feel that they offer something new or of a better quality than anything in that country they will try to set up there to capitalise. The image below clearly shows the three stages of internationalisation, with many firms hoping to remain in stage 2 with the positive factors although on either side there are potential implications. Source: Contractor et al. 2003, p. 27 A good example of internationalisation gone wrong is when Vale from Brazil bought out Inco in Canada. It seemed a straight forward move, Inco and Vale had both been successful in their own markets. It turned out to be a bad combination because they didn’t understand or accept each other’s different culture on how they handled business and each other. It ended up costing Vale a lot of money and tarnished their image and reputation. I think that as a future employee internationalisation will affect me greatly, I chose this course because I think that understanding and respecting other cultures is very important, before any business is done it is important to learn what makes people tick, then you know how to motivate them to a certain extent. In my opinion it can be hugely overlooked, if it wasn’t I think that many disagreements could be averted. Dealing with people is a huge part of business whether its potential investors or a fellow employee, if you understand peoples cultures very often you can learn from them, leading to very clever organisational cultures that can motivate and inspire the majority of the workforce leading to a smoother internationalisation process. Bibliography D. A. BUCHANAN, A. A. (2010). Organizational Behaviour. Essex: Pearson Education Ltd 2010. Kenyon, P. (2000, October 15). Gap and Nike: No Sweat? Retrieved December 13, 2011, from BBC: http://news. bc. co. uk/1/hi/programmes/panorama/970385. stm Loerrach. (2003). The impact of internatioalization on organizational culture a comparative study of international US and German companies, 7-48. M. L. JONES. (2007). Hofstede – Culturally Questionable, 7-8. RICKY W, P. M. (2007). International Business 5th Edition. GRIFFIN. Roache, R. ( 2010, February 9). Should religion be an excuse for carrying daggers? Retrieved December 13, 2011, from BBC: http://news. bbc. co. uk/1/hi/magazine/8506074. stm Unknown. (2011, December 13). Retrieved December 13, 2011, from Oxford Dictionaries: http://oxforddictionaries. com/definition/culture

Saturday, January 4, 2020

Reflection of Learning Theories in My Life - 617 Words

Learning is nothing but acquisition of a new behaviour based on some conditions, which can be environmental, physical, mental, and social so on. I believe the theory of learning I would be inclined towards would have to be behaviourist. This theory entails linking of a new behaviour to a stimulus by providing reinforcement or support after the correct behaviour is produce. Furthermore, behaviourists explain behaviour in terms of the stimuli that produce it and the event, which caused an individual to learn to respond to the stimuli that way. Behaviourist’s uses two methods of explaining the process, which are Classical conditioning wherein people learn to associate two stimuli when the two of them occur together, such that the response originally produced by one stimulus transfer to another. The person learns to produce an existing response to a new stimulus. The other one is Operant Conditioning where people learn to perform new behaviours through the consequences of the thin gs they do. If a behaviour they produce follows by reinforcement then the likelihood of that behaviour likely to repeat which increases in future and will strengthen. A consequence can be reinforcing in two ways: either the person gets something good (positive reinforcement) or they avoid something bad (negative reinforcement) Relating this to my lifestyle, I found myself to fall in the behaviourist theory under the operant conditioning. My behaviour is performing according to the things I do. ForShow MoreRelatedThe Importance Of Critical Reflection On Teaching1270 Words   |  6 PagesImportance of reflection: Reflection on practice has different meanings, in my view it means constructive criticism: being honest with myself, becoming aware of and understanding my own strengths, and being able to review activities and constantly test assumptions related to our work. 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Reflection of Learning Theories in My Life - 617 Words

Learning is nothing but acquisition of a new behaviour based on some conditions, which can be environmental, physical, mental, and social so on. I believe the theory of learning I would be inclined towards would have to be behaviourist. This theory entails linking of a new behaviour to a stimulus by providing reinforcement or support after the correct behaviour is produce. Furthermore, behaviourists explain behaviour in terms of the stimuli that produce it and the event, which caused an individual to learn to respond to the stimuli that way. Behaviourist’s uses two methods of explaining the process, which are Classical conditioning wherein people learn to associate two stimuli when the two of them occur together, such that the response originally produced by one stimulus transfer to another. The person learns to produce an existing response to a new stimulus. The other one is Operant Conditioning where people learn to perform new behaviours through the consequences of the thin gs they do. If a behaviour they produce follows by reinforcement then the likelihood of that behaviour likely to repeat which increases in future and will strengthen. A consequence can be reinforcing in two ways: either the person gets something good (positive reinforcement) or they avoid something bad (negative reinforcement) Relating this to my lifestyle, I found myself to fall in the behaviourist theory under the operant conditioning. My behaviour is performing according to the things I do. ForShow MoreRelatedThe Importance Of Critical Reflection On Teaching1270 Words   |  6 PagesImportance of reflection: Reflection on practice has different meanings, in my view it means constructive criticism: being honest with myself, becoming aware of and understanding my own strengths, and being able to review activities and constantly test assumptions related to our work. These have been my approach to critical reflection throughout the year. This is supported by Brookfield, he says that Critically reflective teaching happens when we identify and scrutinise the assumptions that undergirdRead MoreHow Constructivist Theory Changed My Transition From A Beginning Classroom Teacher954 Words   |  4 Pagesindividual’s life and each new experience builds upon the knowledge gained from past experiences. As I attempt to explain and understand how the constructivist theory affected my transition from a beginning classroom teacher to an instructional school leader, I must admit that I didn’t really understand the process until it became a reality for me. I woke up one day and realized that things that were very difficult for me suddenly became second nature to me. Upon further reflection, I now realizeRead MoreActive Experimentation And Its Effects On Reality And The Starting Of The Cycle1116 Words   |  5 Pagesour frames of reference, to allow the missing link to sink in. Once again, I consider that the degree of learning experience of the learner is important to achieve this. I have not been able to map this last step of Kolb’s cycle with a simulation experience as it happens post-simulation. Active experimentation is the testing of the new knowledge acquired during simulation against a real life experience. I personally see simulation like the platform for a rehearsed reality, like giving learners theRead MoreExperiential Learning880 Words   |  3 PagesExperiential Learning: Experiential learning is a process that basically demonstrates and focuses on the role of experience in the learning process. This process has been explained by various theorists who have developed some theories including Experiential Learning Theory, cognitive learning theories, and Social Constructivist Theory. The Experiential Learning Theory offers a holistic model of the process of learning and multi-linear form of adult development that shows the process with whichRead MoreCanadian Social Work Practice : A New Horizon Of Learning Essay1660 Words   |  7 PagesCanadian Social Work Practice: A New Horizon of Learning My clear and definite understanding of critical theories and postmodern thoughts provides me significant and appropriate frameworks to practice as a progressive social worker in Canadian context (Morley, 2003). My exploration of reflective practice and the fundamentals of critical self reflection approach enhanced my understanding of specific client situations. 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Reflection of Learning Theories in My Life - 617 Words

Learning is nothing but acquisition of a new behaviour based on some conditions, which can be environmental, physical, mental, and social so on. I believe the theory of learning I would be inclined towards would have to be behaviourist. This theory entails linking of a new behaviour to a stimulus by providing reinforcement or support after the correct behaviour is produce. Furthermore, behaviourists explain behaviour in terms of the stimuli that produce it and the event, which caused an individual to learn to respond to the stimuli that way. Behaviourist’s uses two methods of explaining the process, which are Classical conditioning wherein people learn to associate two stimuli when the two of them occur together, such that the response originally produced by one stimulus transfer to another. The person learns to produce an existing response to a new stimulus. The other one is Operant Conditioning where people learn to perform new behaviours through the consequences of the thin gs they do. If a behaviour they produce follows by reinforcement then the likelihood of that behaviour likely to repeat which increases in future and will strengthen. A consequence can be reinforcing in two ways: either the person gets something good (positive reinforcement) or they avoid something bad (negative reinforcement) Relating this to my lifestyle, I found myself to fall in the behaviourist theory under the operant conditioning. My behaviour is performing according to the things I do. ForShow MoreRelatedThe Importance Of Critical Reflection On Teaching1270 Words   |  6 PagesImportance of reflection: Reflection on practice has different meanings, in my view it means constructive criticism: being honest with myself, becoming aware of and understanding my own strengths, and being able to review activities and constantly test assumptions related to our work. 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In my own personal point of view, I will develop ways to study and learn in a way that will meet my own necessities. When I will be building up my skills, I would be able to find out what is working for me and what isn’t. I will have to understand the concepts, theories and ideas that are much more appropriate for my level 4 and levelRead MoreI Am Active As Lecturer At Icon College Of Technology And Management868 Words   |  4 Pagesset by the college. As a tutor my responsibility is to deliver lectures only where I try to connect my teaching strategies with learning theories suitably. In writing this reflection I want to focus on three aspects- learning, teaching and assessment. Learning I focus on students’ needs and strongly believe in maintaining educational transparency (FT1: Statement of teaching philosophy). So, I try to know who my students are and what are their needs and motives. Learning motives of adults and childrenRead MorePersonal Reflection And Development Plan1431 Words   |  6 PagesPersonal Reflection and Development Plan Reflective practice has helped many people to improve their learning. It is a valuable tool often used by healthcare and education providers to improve their approach to work by questioning their actions. Throughout my short time spent in Higher Education (HE) I have learned many new aspects of learning like different learning styles and models of reflection and this provides me with an opportunity to look back over these ideas and reflect. This will allowRead MoreAdult Learning Theory Paper1041 Words   |  5 PagesAdult Learning Theory Paper INFT 101 Section 7 7 March 2013 Summary In an effort to determine how adults learn, experts examine and evaluate studies that have been done that involve the adult learner. The more that experts understand how the learner processes information, the better the understanding will be on how to structure their learning environment. Research is continually changing in this area, and educators know there are differences in how each adult learner attains information